Routine   1 comment

A routine is the framework we hang our lives on.

I know mine keeps me going and sane many times.  I mean that in multiple ways.

People often comment on how organized I am when they see our house and learn that I homeschool.  More so if they find out that I only go to the grocery store once every two weeks, with a menu planned to last that long.  I just stop in on the off weeks to get milk, bananas and lettuce.

And that’s true, I am very organized.

And it’s also true that being organized and having a daily and weekly routine helps keep us productive, most chores done, some seasonal work up to date (just being honest here as I still have quite a bit of fall yard work undone), and school both completed and recorded.

But that’s not what I mean when I say a routine is the framework we hang our lives on.

When everything else is blowing up in your face–you’re unsettled, depressed, uncertain–circumstances are unpredictable: at those times, having a next step to step into when you can’t even think clearly is a real gift.

I can’t tell you how many school mornings in the winter, I’d get up, make breakfast, light a candle in the den to drive away some of that January stuff, and then the only reason I knew what to do next was because I had a routine.  I’d already done it.  I kept doing it.  Later in the day, things were better, and I was thankful I hadn’t ended up spending half an hour crying in the shower, or just gone back to bed.  (Of course it helps if you have other people who won’t let you stay in bed.)

Another time routine is a gift is when I’m really anxious.  If something is disturbing me, whether circumstance or just an unfavorable brain chemistry at that moment, thinking can get pretty adrenaline affected.  Things seem to spin.  I start with one thought, move to another, and then a third, but end up right back where I started.  At times like those when my world feels as if it’s spinning out of rational control, when I do the next thing in my routine, and then the next, and then the next, I eventually get through it.  I don’t slip off the edge.

I figure this is probably what women pressed to the limit in truly difficult situations do as well, in places where they’re displaced, there’s disease, disaster, death.  They figure out a routine.  And they do it.  Because that’s what they need to keep going.

And it’s a real gift.

 

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Posted November 25, 2014 by swanatbagend in identity

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One response to “Routine

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  1. Maybe that’s why I like to play Bach when anxious or distressed. It seems like if routine was set to music, it would surely be Bach!

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