That’s What Friends Do   1 comment

We’ve really never done trick or treating.  We live in the country and never get trick or treaters, and being homeschooled we aren’t in the mainstream where other kids are talking about costumes and candy all the time.  Plus, I really did not want to get into it with my youngest being extremely susceptible to the effects of food coloring, high fructose corn syrup and too much sugar!

Not to mention the work of creating costumes–blah.

However, this year friends asked us to join them at Ridgecrest Avenue to see the amazing decorations, and my son had been doing much better dealing with the ingestion of sweets.  Despite his general dislike of being around people he doesn’t know, the draw of cool decorations and candy was too appealing–so I told the kids if they were entirely responsible for their own costumes, they could go. I would drive them there and walk up and down with them to see the sights and mingle with the throng.

Large crowds, uncontrolled situations, and Halloween have never been my cup of tea, so this was definitely putting myself out there.

The night of Halloween all started off well.  The kids had their costumes taken care of and when we arrived in the neighborhood we had no trouble finding a parking place. Waiting for our friends to arrive, those who were already there talked and laughed.

Once all gathered, smallers corralled in strollers, we made our way to the desired thoroughfare.

It was jammed with people.

So far so good–but then my son discovered the classic problem with a ghost costume (one that I had not thought to check for, since after all, the costumes were not my problem): eye hole size creates visibility problems.

Avoided a face plant but he did fall down when he tripped over sidewalk stairs he couldn’t see.

He’s back at my side after getting the candy, and somewhat tearfully says, “I think I’m done, Mom. I can’t do this.”

Internally I’m sighing and cringing, thinking, “Please Lord, let my child on the autism spectrum have a normal, positive, standard childhood experience,” while not at all sure there is a way for that to happen.

However, I have an idea that we can hold the sheet back so the eye holes are easier to see out of, with the same masking tape that has already repaired a shattered sword for one of our friends.

And, friends to the rescue.   Mom of six has, among other things, scissors and a safety pin with her…thank you Lord.

I tell my son, “I have an idea for how to modify your costume, so you can see out better.  Can I try that?”

“OK,” he accedes, and I pull the sheet off briskly, and proceed to cut the eye holes larger.  My son is ill at ease at first, as he notices that he is delaying his sister and four other children.

But, thank you Lord again, my friend tells him, “It’s all right; this is no problem.  They’ll wait for you.  That’s what friends do.”

Eye holes widened, the costume is re-applied to his head, and we safety pin it back.

“How does that seem?”

“OK.”

“You want to try it?  I’ll be right behind you to start out with.”

Off he goes, reassured, with his sister and friends.

They walked the entire circuit, up Ridgecrest and all the way back, and my son kept his ghost costume on until maybe the last 1/5th of the journey.  He had a wonderful time, collected a delightful amount of candy, and was so pleased with his experience and all the creepy or funny decorations.

Who knew something so blessed, friendship, could shine so brightly on a dark night?

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One response to “That’s What Friends Do

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  1. Having all of you there made it a much more wonderful experience for us, too.

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