The Unexpected   Leave a comment

So two blogs back, I listed the top ten favorite places or memories from the recent trip we took to California, while delivering our oldest to grad school.  I knew on this trip we would head into new territory simply because while our family enjoys camping in our pop-up in the west, we have never ventured so far before (mainly because it’s a heckuva drive and requires too much vacation time).  We have camped in Texas, New Mexico, Utah, Arizona, Colorado, Wyoming and Montana, and the states you must drive through to get to these places from our home.  But we had never continued past western Wyoming.  So when we reached Salt Lake City and went, well, beyond, I knew it would be different.

However, until you’ve been there–to Nevada–to California–you can’t know how different it will be.

Some of these differences are just wonderfully striking.  California seems to be a land of extremes, all different types of biomes and so many amazing giant plants.  Then there’s the unsurpassed Yosemite Valley.  There’s no place else like it on earth.  So all of these things were glorious.

But we had all other sorts of unexpected moments.  Those of you who are well-traveled know that on any trip, alongside the wonderful memories, the beautiful places, and the great pictures, you also experience the Other Stuff.  Stuff that is bizarre–the strange–the unusual–in short, the unexpected.

Here are the highlights.

First, it is disorienting but delightful to be able to travel from one biome into a different one when traveling up and down the Coast range in California.  You are in a golden, grassy field with the wind blowing through, and thistles, and twisted trees, and then you take a winding two-lane road sharply downhill past some vineyards, and just like that, you’re in a primeval forest of giant trees.

Food was definitely less expensive than at home–I could get, say, plums, for one-third of what I’d been paying all summer.

Also, the location of the entrance doors for grocery stores in California seemed to be a secret only locals understood.  It took me a while to figure out how to get in, since the doors I always walked up to were clearly marked “exit”.

We also had various adventures that were mostly created by the challenge of having one group of people driving two vehicles cross-country.  These included our scenic tour of the Salt Lake City airport, when our intention was just to find the last gas station before the Great Salt Flats.  The airport access and apparently the entire airport were under construction and the road followed a meandering route similar to what food experiences moving through your intestines, so it took us a while to find our way back to the interstate.  I’m sure the jet-setting departees from the airport were amused to see a golden yellow Penske truck crawling through the detours, closely followed by a dirty minivan towing an old pop-up trailer.

We also took an accidental detour into a semi-truck weigh station as we approached the agriculture check after entering California.

Then, once we got back out of the line for the weigh station, I discovered that while I was doing a great job driving the moving truck, the one thing I did not actually have with me in the truck was the key for the padlock we had put on the back compartment to secure it.  The key, which yes we needed when they asked us to open the back, was conveniently located in a very safe location: the glove box of the other vehicle.

We also had the door of the pop-up camper take a ninety degree flop to the right.  This is normal protocol and would have been ideal if we were setting up camp at the time.

Instead we were hurtling downhill from Donner Pass.  But thanks to the two-way radios, the people in the moving truck were able to alert the driver of the pop-up rig before any supplies came out to decorate the shoulder.

I did not expect to spend an evening helping my son pick baby ticks off himself in Kansas.

I did not expect to have ants invade the cooler at the RV park in Sacramento West.

Or to have a man invade the bathroom at the RV park in Sacramento West.

But he wasn’t the only man I found in women’s bathrooms.  There were routinely men in the women’s bathrooms in Hodgdon Meadow campground in Yosemite.

Perhaps this was because the men’s urinal was non-functional and full the entire time we were camping there.  This may have been caused by the sheer difficulty of bringing in plumbing supplies to a location so remote.  That was another unexpected–the sheer remoteness of the places we visited in the mountains.  I had no idea looking at a map that the roads would be so winding, the elevation changes so extreme.  There was nothing remotely resembling cell reception at either park we stayed in.  In fact, even after we drove out of the redwood valley park on our way back toward San Jose and were cruising the top edges of the ridges, where you’d think there wouldn’t be any large obstacles blocking signals from cell towers, there still was no reception.

But that was actually part of the charm of the state park we enjoyed.  Portola Redwoods State Park has not yet been discovered by the masses.  They don’t give change at the gift shop, and they don’t accept outgoing mail.  It is quiet and un-busy there.  One of the most rewarding events during our stay there was that Portola has been discovered by the masses–masses of vivid yellow banana slugs.  We got to meet them and play with them on our second day after a light rain brought them out trolling the campground for treats.  So I’d have to say another unexpected thing about California was the sheer number of luscious banana slugs.

Also, we learned that a yellow jacket is strong enough to take off with a bacon bit in her mandibles.  I did not know that.

She landed on someone’s salad plate after dinner, found an abandoned bacon bit, checked it out, grasped it firmly and then to the surprise of all managed to lift off!  Sure the flight trajectory was a bit sloppy, and she buzzed my forehead as she took off, but she left with that bacon, and came back later for more.

Our campsite in Yosemite was totally unexpected.  The ranger at the check in said he wasn’t sure how we’d park our pop-up in site thirty-three but we thought he was joking–until we got to the site.  We look at it.  Silence.  Then my husband says, “I’m sorry.  I had no idea this site was like this.”  It really wasn’t his fault that it was approximately forty feet from the road to the picnic table and bear box, and downhill steeply enough all the way that, no, you really couldn’t level an RV of any kind on the provided pad.  We had to camp parallel to the road crammed in behind a large dumpster.  The compensations were that we ended up cooking outside at the table near the bear box, since that’s where all the food was anyway, it was actually quite pleasant, and we were reminded that we could survive without using the super galley kitchen inside the pop-up.

I guess I should have expected something groovy and relaxed, since we were on the beach in California, but I was not quite ready to see a naked old man dive into the freezing surf at Point Reyes.

However, as I say, this is California.

One of the last unexpected things actually happened at home.  Our pop-up has an awning we use sometimes and like most such awnings, it stores rolled up, attached to the length of the pop-up by adhesive.  When you’re driving at highway speed and it’s an unusually windy day, you will see the awning bag flop up and down when looking in the rear view mirror.  It did that all the way across Kansas (because why would it be windy in Kansas?) and I remember thinking “of course this awning is designed to handle the stress of being blown like that.”

We were unloading the supplies the day after we got back.  After taking a short break, I went back out for the remainders, to discover the entire awning lying peacefully on the doorstep of the camper.  After thousands and thousands of miles on the road during which it could have given way to bludgeon the vehicle behind us, instead it waited until we were at home to drop to the ground.

Now that’s unexpected.

 

 

 

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Posted October 24, 2017 by swanatbagend in humor, travel journal

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Vulnerable   4 comments

When the standard parameters of your life are removed, you instantly realize just how vulnerable you are to the rest of reality, how vulnerable you are to the problems that those other people out there face.

The job my husband had and the income it generated were like the sun and moon to me, predictable, normal, usual, a relied upon framework for the rest of our business and our lives.  It did not occur to either one of us, for a variety of reasons which we now realize were a bit naive, that he would ever be laid off.  He was.  He was one of the people let go in a RIF last month.  If you had asked me six weeks ago what problem we might face next, being laid off would not have been on any potential list.

Getting that phone call from my husband at 8:30 on a Monday morning changed my framework.

All of a sudden we were the ones who did not have an income.  We were the ones who did not have ongoing medical coverage.  He was the one who did not have an office to go to and a routine to follow, nor a cell phone nor a laptop to transact business on.

I have had problems before, but they were other kinds of problems, chronic issues that I’d gotten used to dealing with.  When a big life stress like this one comes along, besides realizing that you are not invulnerable, you see that whatever you said you believed about the faithfulness of God suddenly becomes immensely more urgent and more practical.

We had a really great job for over twelve years.  It provided for our needs in amazing ways all that time.  It was wonderful.

But it was never guaranteed.  It didn’t belong to us any more than any thing ethereal or material belongs to us, nor could we make it keep happening.

We belong to God not the other way round.

We belong to God, and he can do what he wants with our plans and our money and our lives.  He made us and not we ourselves.

We belong to God, and he is good, and he is faithful.

Posted October 14, 2017 by swanatbagend in identity

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Easy Mexican Dinner   1 comment

I made these fish tacos the other night and wanted to share.

4 medium tilapia fillets

2 T. olive oil

3 T. lime juice

1 tsp. ground cumin

1/2 tsp. garlic powder

1/2 tsp. salt

1/4 tsp. pepper

2 T. fresh chopped cilantro

Mix the above ingredients except for the fish and then marinate the fish for several hours.  Grill fish or cook as you like until done.  Serve with the following toppings and a salsa that you like, on tortillas of your choice.  We like corn tortillas fried in coconut oil.

 

Cilantro Slaw

@ 3 cups finely chopped cabbage

3 green onions, chopped

3 T. fresh cilantro finely chopped

1 or 2 T. lime juice

Mix all ingredients.

 

Lime Cream Sauce

1 1/2 cups sour cream

2-3 T. lime juice

1 tsp. ground cumin

1/2 tsp salt

dash garlic powder

Mix all ingredients.

 

If you want things more flavorful just add the fun stuff until you reach the level of seasoning you like.  Serves four.  Enjoy!

Posted October 3, 2017 by swanatbagend in food

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Top Ten Favorite Things from our trip to California   1 comment

Our family recently took a trip from the upper Midwestern United States all the way to the Pacific Coast in order to move our son and his books and belongings to grad school. We camped along the way and continued to do so after we turned in the Penske moving truck. Nobody in our family had experienced the Golden State recently and our children–not at all. It was quite an experience in the land of extremes.

Here, in no particular order, are my handselected favorite experiences and most wonderful places of this trip.

1. Like most people who visit it, I would have to start with Yosemite Valley.

2. Watching the water at the Vernal Falls footbridge in Yosemite Valley while everyone under 23 years of age climbed all the way to the top of the falls trail

3. Watching the Pacific Ocean under my feet, while sea lions played in the foam, from the Golden Gate Bridge

4. Our campsite at Portola Redwoods State park was surrounded by our own cordon of redwood guardian sentinels. There were five immense, wise trees around the table and campfire circle.

5. The Old Tree and Slate trails at Portola Redwoods leading to the Old Tree herself

6. Highway 20 east of Grass Valley, the prettiest forest drive I’ve ever seen

7. My oldest son experiencing a banana slug oozing across his face

8. The Humboldt River Valley in Nevada (I realize this particular view was not in California, but it’s still one of the best things about the trip.)

9. Having our cousin from Colorado come along with us the share the work (sorry, E!), the adventures, the stress and the joy!

10. Late night singing of Monty Python and Weird Al songs on the way back to the campground from our day in the Bay area

Posted September 21, 2017 by swanatbagend in camping, travel journal

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Generations   1 comment

Like waves overlapping as they wash in to the shore, so one generation is mingled with the next. It shares genetics, life experiences, a home, a past, and a last name. It’s difficult to separate one wave from the next when you watch the water at the beach. You can’t escape the waves by waiting for the gap between them because there isn’t really a gap. There’s just a low spot, and there is still always water around your ankles.

Like these waves, one generation is blended with the next.

Then, at the right moment, it must advance alone.

Posted August 30, 2017 by swanatbagend in reflections

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Get Ready for It   Leave a comment

What is the most important skill you will need as a parent?

If you have read books, blogs and articles, or attended classes, I’m sure you’ve been told many things about what it takes to be a parent and how you need to handle various situations with your children.

I submit that what you need most is forgiveness.

Why?

Because you will not be a great parent.

I know.  If you haven’t already had children you think you will be.  You’ve looked around you, seen it done wrong, had it done wrong to you, and you know what to do.

And it isn’t really that difficult; people have been doing it for generations.

And you know that you will do parenting just as well as you’ve done everything else–school, work, competitions, hobbies.

 

But if you think this, you will be wrong.

 

You will make the same mistakes with your children, over and over.

You will be impatient and lose your temper at least once, or perhaps many times.

You will handle situations in the same way that your parents did, even though you know in advance that you do not plan to handle situations the same way your parents did.

You will be unable to implement all of the skills you learn in the parenting class.

You will not teach your child some of the things he needs to know because you will be unaware of what they are or that he needs to be taught them.

 

You will damage your children.

So, their forgiveness will need to be asked.

 

Posted August 30, 2017 by swanatbagend in motherhood, parenting

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Still Full of Surprises   Leave a comment

You think you know yourself when you’ve reached middle age, but I learned there are things about me that I could not have imagined, even a few years ago.

Generally I think I know what my preferences are, my problems, my besetting sins, my interests, my ambitions–when you have lived more than half your life, you feel pretty set.

But, I’ve found that I’m not.

I am actually willing to try new things (sometimes).  Or visit attractions that aren’t anything up my alley.

Last year my husband and I went on two different distillery tours when we got away for our anniversary.  I wasn’t that interested, but he was, and a getaway’s a getaway, right? I’m up for anything that he wants to do, for a few hours at least.

Maker’s Mark tour was fascinating!

Then this year we took in the Corvette museum.  Yes, that’s the one that had a sinkhole open up in the floor of the main showroom.  I am definitely not a sports car person.  Not even a car person.  But I said sure, since we were in the area and it was something different.

It was interesting too.

The first thing I realized while there, that I then realized also applied to the bourbon tours, was that just about every type of museum or attraction you can go to (except maybe a plain old amusement park) has these components 1) history and 2) science.  And if I can get a history component, I’m good to go.  So, a Corvette is a car that is very fast.  It was originally created in 1953 and has been through seven different iterations.  In 1983 they were working on redesigning the body style, and they ended up only making a few, most of which ended up being re-done as 1984 Corvettes, so there is only one remaining actual 1983 Corvette.  We saw it.  So don’t let anyone catch you out with a trick question about how many 1983 Corvettes there are.  There’s only one.

But see, there’s history already, and so I’m happy.

However, weirder still was what happened when I saw one of the four Corvettes available by drawing.  In the rotunda room, the same one with the sinkhole lines marked on the floor (very cool), there was one model for each generation of Corvette.  The newest generation’s representative is a black 2017 Stingray Convertible.

Remember, I’m not a car person.  My interests run more to history, which I already mentioned, art and literature.  And food.

When I stood in front of that beautiful car, I felt a thrill.  I could feel my adrenaline rushing and my blood pressure going up.  I wanted that car.  I wanted to win in and drive away in it, very fast.

And I thought I knew myself.

Posted August 26, 2017 by swanatbagend in identity

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