Archive for the ‘summer camp’ Tag

The Summer Camp “Arms Race”   Leave a comment

So I stole the title from an article in the August 11 issue of The Economist.  You probably know people who send their kids to multiple summer camps.  There are apparently still camps that include nature and campfires, but around the world, those who have enough money are sending their children to better camps.  According to the article, the end goal in a lot of different cases is getting into college.  And apparently getting into the camps themselves is also competitive.  Canada/USA Mathcamp admits just 15% of applicants.  Nine year olds in London can attend a technology summer camp for only 1,700 US dollars.  Nine.  Years. Old.

Then there’s the kids in South Korea who are practicing debate by discussing whether plastic surgery should be banned, in the English language, of course.  This sounds like a fun way to spend the summer–if your parents’ ultimate goal is again, the best colleges.  Did I mention these are eight and nine-year olds?

What’s that all about?

Even twenty years ago it wasn’t like this.  Fifty years ago it certainly wasn’t.

I’m not saying there’s nothing good to be gained from experiences at niche camps.  I’m not saying we can necessarily go backwards in time.

But people, I just don’t understand what this rat race is about.  Or, if you prefer the term The Economist uses, what this arms race is about.

Why isn’t anyone hearing common sense or the research that says that time for free, pretend play and time for outdoor play and time to just be is absolutely necessary for human development?

Why is it necessary to make sure your children are better than the rest?  In this world, can you even have a life in which you’re content?  How did this happen?

Are there just too many of us?

 

Posted September 6, 2018 by swanatbagend in identity, learning

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